Research Report #1:

Kennedy, M. K., Thomas, C. N., Meyer, J. P., Alves, K. A., & Lloyd, J. L. (2014). Using evidence-based multimedia to improve vocabulary performance of adolescents with LD: A UDL approach. Learning Disability Quarterly, 37, 71–86.

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 Research Report #2:

King-Sears, M. E., Johnson, T. M., Berkeley, S., Weiss, M. P., Peters-Burton, E. E., Evmenova, A. S., … Hursh, J. C. (2015). An exploratory study of universal design for teaching chemistry to students with and without disabilities. Learning Disability Quarterly, 38(2), 84–96.

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 Research Report #3:

Rappolt-Schlichtmann, G., Daley, S. G., Lim, S., Lapinski, S., Robinson, K. H., & Johnson, M. (2013). Universal design for learning and elementary school science: exploring the efficacy, use, and perceptions of a web-based science notebook.

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Research Report #4:

Morningstar, M. E., Shogren, K. A., Lee, H., & Born, K. (2015). Preliminary lessons about supporting participation and learning in inclusive classrooms observations. Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities, 40(3), 192–210.

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Research Report #5:

Schelly, C. L., Davies, P. L., & Spooner, C. L. (n.d.). Student perceptions of faculty implementation of universal design for learning. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 24(1), 17–30.

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Research Report #6:

Dean, T., Lee-Post, A., & Hapke, H. (2017). Universal design for learning in teaching large lecture classes. Journal of Marketing Education, 39(1), 5-16.

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 Research Report #7:

Masson, A., Klop T., & Osseweijer P. (2016). An analysis of the impact of student-scientist interaction in a technology design activity, using the expectancy-value model of achievement related choice. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 26, 81-104.

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Research Report #8:

Griful-Freixenet, J., Struyven, K., Verstichele, M., & Andries, C. (2017). Higher education students with disabilities speaking out: perceived barriers and opportunities of the Universal Design for Learning framework. Disability & Society, 32(10), 1627–1649.

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